Category Archives: On the W3 (world wide web)

Links to web sites of interest

Where in the world is Carmen San Diego

It seems I haven’t posted anything here in quite a while, months even. I have been busy working on many projects and I really like the Google+ project which is where I have been spending most of my time.

You can come say hi to me or visit and peruse my content with this link Rocket G+

Hope to see you soon.

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Are you included? Don’t get left behind with your browser.

Keep your browser up to date. Are you using a browser that brings you the best experience? HTML5 has hit the internet and is changing the way websites are experienced, the only difference being that you may not be seeing the difference. Only browsers that support the new HTML5 code will see its content properly if at all. Here is how the browsers stack up:

HTML5 specifies a standard way to include video, with the video element.

Video Formats

Currently, there are 3 supported video formats for the video element:

Format IE Firefox Opera Chrome Safari
Ogg No 3.5+ 10.5+ 5.0+ No
MPEG 4 9.0+ No No 5.0+ 3.0+
WebM No 4.0+ 10.6+ 6.0+ No
  • Ogg = Ogg files with Theora video codec and Vorbis audio codec
  • MPEG4 = MPEG 4 files with H.264 video codec and AAC audio codec
  • WebM = WebM files with VP8 video codec and Vorbis audio codec

The audio element can play sound files, or an audio stream.

Audio Formats

Currently, there are 3 main formats for the audio element:

Format IE 9 Firefox 3.5 Opera 10.5 Chrome 3.0 Safari 3.0
Ogg Vorbis No Yes Yes Yes No
MP3 Yes No No Yes Yes
Wav No Yes Yes Yes Yes

As you can see there is only one company doing their homework and doing it to benefit you, and that is Google who produces the Chrome Browser.  

The most important thing to remember is to get updates for your browser as soon as you can. Microsoft, Mozilla, Apple and Google are all making changes and updating their browsers to keep up with the new HTML5 code changes, however Google is the only company who sends you the updates automatically and is the only company making you and your browsing experience the priority. The latest version of the Chrome browser as of this posting is 12.0.742.112, however you can always click on the wrench and select About Google Chrome to see your current version.

Google URL Shortener

Google URL Shortener

via Google URL Shortener

 

 

 

 

 

 

Most Important Windows Security Patch Ever | PC Pitstop

I’m writing about this referenced article because it is a prime example of why software developers should be supporting and developing software for Unix/Linux/Mac operating systems.

Aside from the fact that Bill Gates and his engineers refuse to develop an OS that properly handles system resources, they still haven’t given proper attention to preventing exploits and security issues before releasing an OS.

Instead, a deadline is set for the release of the next version of windows, and then a mad rush ensues to meet that deadline at the expense of the consumers. The mindset of the Gates’ family is to get the product out first, and then patch the hell out of it later to keep in step with Apple and Linux.

This is a huge message to the public. First and foremost the focus is in the wrong place (on beating the competition) and second there is a reason why they feel they need to stay ahead or beat others to the cutting edge. It is because others are on the cutting edge first with an OS that is not vulnerable to hackers and those others have an OS that properly handles system resources and memory calls that far exceeds what Gates and Microsoft have ever offered…ever.

This is not to say Gates isn’t smart because he does understand that the only way to beat better technology and engineering (machine language architecture) is to beat them to the store shelves. Unfortunately the people that pay the price for this kind of “beating the competition to the line” is the consumer.

So why are software developers giving more attention and focus to Microsoft and their OS? Because they know that a profit is made from being first to the line, not from supporting a better architecture. Developers understand money in the pocket now, not long term investment returns.

What exactly will turn this tide of backward thinking in the software industry? The answer is in the proliferation of incidents like the cyber attack on the nuclear power plant in Iran this year. The more times an incident like this makes the news showing the vulnerability of the OS and network, the more obvious it will become to software developers that they are supporting the wrong system and shift to supporting a system that cant be hacked. Once they recognize they are on the wrong ship (the one sinking every year) they will gladly jump over to the ship they never have to jump off.

Until then, as a consumer who wishes to be rid of the need for anti-virus software and not have to buy a new computer every year that has a system that slows to a snails pace, and doesn’t want to worry about the information on their computers being compromised regularly, they have options like Knoppix, Ubuntu, and other unix/linux/debian based Operating Systems to give them what they need. Eventually consumers and software developers will be profoundly happy to have switched away from the chaos of Microsoft and the Gates family.

On a side note, Windows costs money, Ubuntu is free as well as Debian, and Knoppix and a host of other Open Source operating systems.

Most Important Windows Security Patch Ever | PC Pitstop

A Higher Purpose

With so many YASNS (yet another social networking site) on the web, a Wiki for feeding your brain (not necessarily with facts), blogs and opinion/editorial sites, what is available for those who feel a higher purpose? Main stream media purports to bring you facts but instead they bring you biased speculations, circumstantial evidence and opinionated viewpoints while rarely producing any facts.

Google has stepped up to the plate to provide a venue for higher knowledge. The Knol. A knol is  a way for people (not Google) to put their reputations and facts on the line, unlike a wiki that is viewed as mostly facts, but edited by the general public with or without verifiable facts. The wiki encourages citations and verifiable sources and provides a means to help promote accuracy and policing of the facts, but this is not 100% guaranteed as is stated in the Wiki’s disclaimer.

The Knol’s purpose is not understood by many, such as those that seem to think it is a market place to their wares as depicted by Will Johnson and his knol here.

For a better explanation of the purpose of a knol, take a look at this one. Maybe with a concerted community effort, we can help the Google knol concept flush out the “opportunists” and garage salesmen from its pages. Fortunately knols provide a star rating system, comments section and if the author allows, the ability to edit or collaborate on a knol. What tools are available beyond the star rating really adds to the credibility and reputation of the author.

Google Wave hits the internet like a Tsunami

#Google #Wave #Googlewave

Google Wave is an incredible web 2.0 development that is revolutionizing the web. Google concentrates on the limitless uses of the internet as its focus for developing new applications and technology to bring information and people closer together.

Google Wave is an online tool for real-time communication and collaboration. A wave can be both a conversation and a document where people can discuss and work together using richly formatted text, photos, videos, maps, and more. Google understands that a computer is as commonplace in our homes as a TV, VCR/DVD player, and microwave. They also understand that 90% of the time spent on a computer at home, is spent surfing the web, instant messaging, playing online games, emailing, and more. Many businesses are also heavily engaged with the internet during the course of the day, video or voice conferencing, collaborating, and a host of other activities.

Google is addressing the amount of internet activity with the wave which is equal parts conversation and document, shared, and live. The wave is a tsunami of productivity that is both needed and required in a cost effective and time managed world as well as a task manager that can be utilized by anyone at home or work.

One aspect of the google wave is to replace the brokenness of email as it is today. In the beginning email was to replace “snail mail” by being cost efficient and reduce delivery time. Email developed into a huge mess of billions of copies of copies and fwd:’s of fwd: fwd:’s with copies of a message stored on your computer and then a copy stored on the recipient’s computer (or on a virtual mail server) and the process is never ending. We wont even go into the junk mail problem. What you have is dead copies of a message all over the world and in millions of computers. The wave revolutionizes and eliminates these electronic piles.

Wave’s Solution: Conversations as Live Documents

Rather than pass back and forth multiple copies of messages, Google Wave hosts a single copy of a conversation that all participants can edit and add to. Wave displays the latest version of the conversation to everyone in the group in real-time, even as it’s changing.

“The goal of Google Wave is to collaborate INSIDE email rather than using email to ARRANGE to collaborate.” —Wave user Marsh Gardiner[1]

The Email Way The Wave Way
People Send or Recipient Participant
Messages Copies Single, hosted conversation
Rich Content Attachments, Links, HTML Inline gadgets
Quoting/commenting Manual Forum-like threading
Privacy CC, BCC Inline, private threads

This is not the only functionality of the Google wave as it is limitless in is uses. The confusing initial Wave experience may thwart its adoption. Wave’s whiz-bang features are impressive, but may not be practical. Whether Wave actually gets adopted as widely as email or remains relegated to niche use like the Segway remains to be seen. But plenty of people want in on the Wave preview, prepared with plenty of ideas about how they’ll use it.

Some Examples:

Caregiver Mike said:

I am looking after an elderly lady named Liz. She is well at the moment but does suffer from spells of confusion and forgetfulness. Liz is a widow but has a large and caring family. Unfortunately they are spread all around the country (none live within a two hours’ drive) and have families and jobs of their own… At the moment I send out a weekly group email detailing what’s happened to Liz over the days of the previous week. The family then replies with any questions or suggestions, etc. Even with Gmail conversations, answering and replying to six responses and further ongoing replies back and forth becomes confusing and very time-consuming. Wave could greatly improve our communications. I would open a new wave at the beginning of each week, inviting all the family to it, and add content on an ongoing current basis. This would mean the family would be far more up to date than they are currently and their responses and queries would be spread out (and inline), far more manageable and more current. Also due to Wave playback, when someone has been away, catch up would be simple.

Bride-to-be Tiffany said:

I am coordinating my wedding with a dozen or so friends/family and various vendors, from all over the country. I live in Texas, the wedding (and my mother) is in Florida, my maid of honor lives in Massachusetts, you get the idea. Currently, we use the telephone and email to exchange ideas, sometimes Skype if we’re lucky enough to be on at the same time. I also have a notebook where I paste pictures of inspiration, jot down links, sketch ideas that I will hold up to my webcam or snap a photo of the page to show others. Seriously. Wave would improve wedding planning SO MUCH. We can all share ideas and see who has jumped in on what jobs in what order. We can use plug-ins to embed venues, caterers, dresses. I can embed a Wave in my wedding blog, which I link to on theknot.com, a wedding planning site that connects you to all sorts of local and national wedding resources. We can Wave simultaneously, which will save us from typing a long response, only for someone else to send something else faster that changes what we just spent time writing (don’t you hate it when that happens?). You know how the bride, her bridesmaids, and her mother all get when they start brainstorming and delegating. Imagine if we were all in the same room. It would get rowdy. This way, with Google Wave, it will be organized, documented, and editable. It will also be a great way for my fiancee to track our progress and see whose ideas are whose and approve or disapprove at will. It will make the perfect planning tool for the perfect wedding.

The following examples of some things Google Wave can do for you are also in the Google Wave Preview in your wave titled “When to use Google Wave” with project links beneath each idea.

Organizing events

Keep a single copy of ideas, suggested itinerary, menu and RSVPs, rather than using many different tools. Use gadgets to add weather, maps and more to the event.

Meeting notes

Prepare a meeting agenda together, share the burden of taking notes and record decisions so you all leave on the same page (we call it being on the same wave). Team members can follow the minutes in real time, or review the history using Playback. The conversation can continue in the wave long after the meeting is over.

Group reports and writing projects

Collaboratively work in real time to draft content, discuss and solicit feedback all in one place rather than sending email attachments and creating multiple copies that get out of sync.

Brainstorming

Bring lots of people into a wave to brainstorm – live concurrent editing makes the quantity of ideas grow quickly! It is easy to add rich content like videos, images, URLs or even links to other waves. Discussion ensues. Etiquettes form. Then work together to distill down to the good ideas.

Photo sharing

Drag and drop photos from your desktop into a wave. Share with others. Use the slideshow viewer. Everyone on the wave can add their photos, too. It is easy to make a group photo album in Google Wave.

For a short preview of what Google wave can do here is a 10 minute video (for those of you that don’t have the 80 minutes for the full presentation that took place at the May 2009 I/O conference).

If you do have 80 minutes to spend, then here is the full presentation in all its glory.

Now, for those looking for quick references and guides and information on how to use the tools of the Google Wave application, I am including the links below. As the Google Wave is in preview mode, it will be undergoing changes and fixes over the course of time until it is rolled out as a complete application, free of course, as all things google are.

This only begins to scratch the surface of all the things Google Wave can do and its related info, reference material, guides, cheat sheets, etc. Check back here often to find more information in the comments of our users and links posted to help you out in getting the most from Google Wave.

Reference: 1. Marsh Gardiner, Twitter.com

The Google Side Wiki

I was really impressed with the simplicity and clean layout of the Google Chrome browser not to mention all of Google’s creations, but this new one really puts a lot of information and education at your fingertips.

The Google Sidewiki

SideWiki

lets you add your input to any part of a web page or comment on the entire page.

You don’t have to be an expert contributing expert insight or advice.

Even Soccermom can add her helpful tips or comment on a web site. The information in the SideWiki is not altering the website you are visiting, it merely attaches the relevant information in a database collected from everyone who has visited the website and commented.

SideWiki operates in the sidebar of your browser if you enable it. You can also close the sidebar SideWiki if you don’t wish to view the associated comments or information.

As with any wiki, it is user generated and user edited for content and is not to be construed as fact or verified/validated fact. Although there will be a vast amount of information that is factual, it is up to the user to determine what is relevant and useful.

Google labs have always impressed me with the amount of information that can be brought to the fingertips with it’s web 2.0 content. I hope you enjoy this new feature as much as I do.

Sidewiki is currently a feature in Google Toolbar (in Internet Explorer and Firefox) and Google Chrome.
In Safari and other browsers you can use the Sidewiki bookmarklet.