Acai Berry Scam

This scam is world wide. It has now made it to Australia and the advertising market is LIT UP with responses to scam ads.

The scam artists prey on your inability to “see” what you are looking at or understand what you are looking at or reading.

Case in point: I ran across an ad in paltalk that looked like the one below and to the fake acai news aduntrained eye would look like a breaking news report that exposes some dark secret about acai berry that doesn’t do what it’s claimed to do. So you click on the ad and your browser opens to a web page for the Daily Health Alerts news page which looks very official including what looks like a news reporter in a professional looking snapshot with a caption. The web page is even designed to show today’s date, plug in some user comments with todays date and a day or two earlier, and plug in an expiration date of today plus 1 day to establish a sense of urgency.

It is safe to open the page from the link I provided above and you can look through it as I explain its parts here. First thing that alerts you to a scam is the professional looking photo of a woman with a caption that causes you to think she is a real reporter or journalist for a news company, until you click on her photo which takes you to a web advertisement page for the acai berry.

acai news1

There is no official company called the Australian Health Inquirer even though a logo is posted top left. You will also notice that the Fox News Special Report at the right sidebar has no video or image or working link, because there isn’t really one.

Second point, the headlines suggests that something has been uncovered and after reading the article you discover that nothing diabolical was uncovered after all and that the opposite is true. The article causes you to believe that the reporter was duped by doing her own test of the product and proved to herself that the product actually works, like a miracle.

Then we come to point #3 at the bottom where the user comments would normally be. We find that there are 10 out of 177 comments showing, BUT WAIT! there are only 9 comments showing, not 10 andacai news2 the last comment has todays date on it. WOW, I JUST missed being able to post a comment, but the comments are “closed due to spam activity” and you are left with nothing to do but read the 9 (not 10) comments that appear to be real from today and the previous day.

These comments talk about “going to”, “about to” “planning to” try the product, and some even say they did try it at exorbitant fees to help you, the reader, feel like you are special by getting the chance to take a free trial offer which by the way, EXPIRES tomorrow! This type of urgency is seared into your mind to make a better selling ad.

acai news 3

Now the truth:

Amazingly enough if you visit the root web address of http://www.dailyhealthalerts.com you find that it is NOT a website with daily health alerts at all. In fact it is a base for the different fake ad web pages to be hosted. There are many other websites on the web just like this mentioning a single mother of two who lost an amazing 42lbs in 3 weeks, or some professional single mother with no time to exercise who lost 37 lbs. in 4 weeks, etc., infinitum.

It’s a real shame that Oprah had an entire show on the effects of acai berry and literally HELPED the scammers sell more product that does nothing more than simple red wine and exercise.  Sadly, Oprah is responsible for helping a LOT of scammers. Don’t become a victim.

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6 responses to “Acai Berry Scam

  1. Pingback: Acai Berry Scam | Australia featured blogs

  2. Just been caught by the scam, they are working out of Cyprus. My Bank (RBS) contacted me to warn me that £68uk Had been taken off my card so they had blocked it. when I returned to my desk I checked out the small print. the 30 day free trial is only 10 day and it starts from the time you place your order. there is no phone number or e-mail address to cancel.

  3. Just saying it should be obvious that this is in fact a scam from the get go. The “news” page links you *CONTINUOUSLY* to the people trying to peddle this berry as their miracle cure. They demand a credit card (basically your money) before they will send you the “free” trial. I honestly hope these scamming jerks get a bowling ball dropped on their knees but that’s just my sentiments.

  4. It is such an obvious con. It is a bit more fancier than a Nigerian money hoax con because they advertise on my email page and photoshop news presenters to pretend the biggest discovery of the century has been made.

    Here is a direct quote from the small print at the bottom.. “This website, and any page on the website, is based loosely off a true story, but has been modified in multiple ways including, but not limited to: the story, the photos, and the comments. ” If people are idiotic enough not to read the small print then they deserve to have their money pried of them.

  5. Adding on… “Trials Expire: Tuesday, January 32, 2011″

    LOL

  6. Fantastic beat ! I would like to apprentice whilst you amend your site, how can i subscribe for a blog website? The account helped me a acceptable deal. I have been a little bit acquainted of this your broadcast offered bright transparent concept

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